As soon as it is clear that there in an investment in avoiding a classic structure, there is call to explore that classic structure. Slow is thrilled to announce its first-ever solo exhibition featuring the paintings of John Henley.

John Henley can’t stop

October 1 - November 12, 2011

There are many ways that a whole becomes fragmented. There are explosions, surgeries, and reductions. Sometimes there is challenge and dissolution that is more part and parcel of the every day. A nugget of paint has fallen off the wall. That nugget will never be news, nor will the thing revealed behind the fall. But the chip is something.

People are at their very most interesting when they are flawed, complicated, relatable, and yet very distinctive from their neighbors. One of the lessons learned from the human genome project is that genetic information is far more complicated than previously imagined. Like the languages we speak, it’s prone to a mistake or two, and equipped to respond to different contexts. DNA can even re-group in response to mistakes.

John paints like that. And he can move himself some paint.

Extraordinarily human, complicated, embodied, sexed, situated in nature, driven by social norms, cosmopolitan, wanting the latest gadget, and fully loaded with neuroses, anxieties, sadnesses, desires, joy and love. Not deconstructed, not reductive. Repeated and reproductive. John’s painting comes from relentless observation, trying it over again, looking at the next step, taking a leap of faith, skipping a beat, making the best of available resources, acknowledging the weak places, throwing out the crappy ones and sweating the small stuff.

As soon as it is clear that there in an investment in avoiding a classic structure, there is call to explore that classic structure. Slow is thrilled to announce its first-ever solo exhibition featuring the paintings of John Henley.

John Henley can’t stop

October 1 - November 12, 2011

There are many ways that a whole becomes fragmented. There are explosions, surgeries, and reductions. Sometimes there is challenge and dissolution that is more part and parcel of the every day. A nugget of paint has fallen off the wall. That nugget will never be news, nor will the thing revealed behind the fall. But the chip is something.

People are at their very most interesting when they are flawed, complicated, relatable, and yet very distinctive from their neighbors. One of the lessons learned from the human genome project is that genetic information is far more complicated than previously imagined. Like the languages we speak, it’s prone to a mistake or two, and equipped to respond to different contexts. DNA can even re-group in response to mistakes.

John paints like that. And he can move himself some paint.

Extraordinarily human, complicated, embodied, sexed, situated in nature, driven by social norms, cosmopolitan, wanting the latest gadget, and fully loaded with neuroses, anxieties, sadnesses, desires, joy and love. Not deconstructed, not reductive. Repeated and reproductive. John’s painting comes from relentless observation, trying it over again, looking at the next step, taking a leap of faith, skipping a beat, making the best of available resources, acknowledging the weak places, throwing out the crappy ones and sweating the small stuff.

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