Newish Carlie Trosclair August 9-23, 2014

Carlie Trosclair made a series of works that she’s not shown before. She’s painted on some with gouache, layered some with fabric, and dug and scraped some things away. She’s tried her hand at making art in ways she’s not done before. Still, to call her work new seems preposterous. Carlie makes art about old spaces using old processes and often begins with old objects that she re-works. She finds places and things with crumbles and patinas, and she piles and layers until the theatrical layers and the uncovered and discovered layers are all the same layer and a new integrated whole. Ish.

Carlie Trosclair is an artist from New Orleans, Louisiana who lives and works in St. Louis, Missouri. Trosclair earned an MFA from the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, a BFA from Loyola University New Orleans, and is a Fellow of the Community Arts Training Institute (MO). Trosclair has completed residencies at ACRE (WI), Vermont Studio Center (VT), Woodside Contemporary Artists Center (NY), chashama (NY) and The Luminary Center for the Arts (MO). Trosclair has exhibited at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (MO), Antenna Gallery (LA), The Armory Center for the Arts (CA), and Swanson Contemporary (KY).

This exhibition is part of our ongoing partnership with ACRE.

Newish
Carlie Trosclair
August 9-23, 2014

Carlie Trosclair made a series of works that she’s not shown before. She’s painted on some with gouache, layered some with fabric, and dug and scraped some things away. She’s tried her hand at making art in ways she’s not done before. Still, to call her work new seems preposterous. Carlie makes art about old spaces using old processes and often begins with old objects that she re-works. She finds places and things with crumbles and patinas, and she piles and layers until the theatrical layers and the uncovered and discovered layers are all the same layer and a new integrated whole. Ish.

Carlie Trosclair is an artist from New Orleans, Louisiana who lives and works in St. Louis, Missouri. Trosclair earned an MFA from the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, a BFA from Loyola University New Orleans, and is a Fellow of the Community Arts Training Institute (MO). Trosclair has completed residencies at ACRE (WI), Vermont Studio Center (VT), Woodside Contemporary Artists Center (NY), chashama (NY) and The Luminary Center for the Arts (MO). Trosclair has exhibited at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (MO), Antenna Gallery (LA), The Armory Center for the Arts (CA), and Swanson Contemporary (KY).

This exhibition is part of our ongoing partnership with ACRE.

ROBBERY IN PROGRESSDrawings by Mike Olson and ceramics by Dean RoperCurated by Jeffrey GrauelJune 28-July 26, 2014
Pay attention and you’ll notice everyone has their hand in someone else’s pocket.Dillinger robbed bankers who were taking peoples homes leaving them on the streets. Folks thought he was a hero. They followed news stories about his heists like sports headlines. Another win for the flamboyant thug who didn’t save the day. He gave regular folks a sense that the world wasn’t completely out of balance.Mike Olson’s drawings are ghosts of depression-era political cartoons resurfacing to tell us that we never learned. Dad’s still down at the pool hall because he can’t get a job and the Man keeps finding new ways to take more of the money we never had. They feel like they were made quickly, in earnest, with what was left, hopefully just in time. It’s the same mirror and we’re still not pretty.Purple tweety bird. Green bart simpson. Alien. Five minutes to choose one plaster bank on a family trip to Tijuana. Out of this army of psychedelic characters I could’ve picked a pig but the blue mickey mouse was the one. As a little kid I was sure whoever made these was having visions and needed cash and I was ready to buy.Dean Roper is sculpting his bongs in the shapes of the things TV has conditioned us to want. Or is it movies? Or music? Maybe it’s Facebook. Possibly it’s just the drugs. Whatever it is he’s got them for us. Not the drugs. The things. The gatorade and the motorcycles and the smiles.Folks are trying to steal from us but we’re calling them out. Don’t hate the players. Hate the game. Take the prize.Mike Olson, a recovering ventriloquist, is no Julian Schnabel. He lives on the Mississippi River. For regular doses of his handy work follow: http://sciencepainted.tumblr.com Dean Roper, serial chiller, keeps things classy in Kansas City. Stay tuned to the magic at:http://www.deanroper.com/

ROBBERY IN PROGRESS
Drawings by Mike Olson and ceramics by Dean Roper
Curated by Jeffrey Grauel
June 28-July 26, 2014

Pay attention and you’ll notice everyone has their hand in someone else’s pocket.

Dillinger robbed bankers who were taking peoples homes leaving them on the streets. Folks thought he was a hero. They followed news stories about his heists like sports headlines. Another win for the flamboyant thug who didn’t save the day. He gave regular folks a sense that the world wasn’t completely out of balance.

Mike Olson’s drawings are ghosts of depression-era political cartoons resurfacing to tell us that we never learned. Dad’s still down at the pool hall because he can’t get a job and the Man keeps finding new ways to take more of the money we never had. They feel like they were made quickly, in earnest, with what was left, hopefully just in time. It’s the same mirror and we’re still not pretty.

Purple tweety bird. Green bart simpson. Alien. Five minutes to choose one plaster bank on a family trip to Tijuana. Out of this army of psychedelic characters I could’ve picked a pig but the blue mickey mouse was the one. As a little kid I was sure whoever made these was having visions and needed cash and I was ready to buy.

Dean Roper is sculpting his bongs in the shapes of the things TV has conditioned us to want. Or is it movies? Or music? Maybe it’s Facebook. Possibly it’s just the drugs. Whatever it is he’s got them for us. Not the drugs. The things. The gatorade and the motorcycles and the smiles.

Folks are trying to steal from us but we’re calling them out. Don’t hate the players. Hate the game. Take the prize.

Mike Olson, a recovering ventriloquist, is no Julian Schnabel. He lives on the Mississippi River. For regular doses of his handy work follow: http://sciencepainted.tumblr.com Dean Roper, serial chiller, keeps things classy in Kansas City. Stay tuned to the magic at:http://www.deanroper.com/

(images of artwork by Kevin Jennings and Jason Dunda)
Slow is excited to partner with Sideshow Theatre Company to present don’t trust the floor, an art exhibition based on—and theatrical reading of—Clare Barron’s new play in development Dirty Crusty.Jeanine and Victor are accidentally reunited on the street. Apparently it’s been a while. Victor makes masks. Jeanine is a slob. Jeanine admires Synda dancing through a window. Synda is a ballerina. Something terrible happens. Granddad’s still there. Granddad is giant and prickly. Wild and vivid stage directions portray a hilarious, sometimes frightening scene definitely not for kids.Artwork inspired by the play including video, sculpture, drawing and performance by Claire Ashley, Tony Balko, Meg Duguid, Jason Dunda, Max Byron Garett, Kevin Jennings, Chuck Jones, Julie Potratz, Rebecca Walz and Ryan Michael Pfeiffer is now on view at Slow.The reading, directed by Sideshow’s artistic director Jonathan L. Green, will take place on June 21, 2014 beginning at 7:30 pm. Doors open at 6:00 pm.Clare Barron is a playwright and performer from Wenatchee, Washington. Her plays include Baby Screams Miracle (Clubbed Thumb Summerworks); Solar Plexus (Ensemble Studio Theatre’s Marathon of One-Act Plays); Dirty Crusty; and You Got Older. She is the 2014 Page 73 Playwriting Fellow. She is also a current member of the Soho Rep Writer/Director Lab and Youngblood at EST. As an actor, Clare recently appeared in the world premiere of Heidi Schreck’s The Consultant at Long Wharf Theatre directed by Kip Fagan. In 2013 she traveled to Beirut to play Mae in an Arabic-English production of María Irene Fornés’ Mud.From Sideshow Theatre Company’s first production, 2008’s Dante Dies!! (and then things get weird), to its Jeff Award-winning productions of Roland Schimmelpfennig’s Idomeneus(named one of the best plays of 2012 by Time Out Chicago and the Chicago Sun-Times) and Elizabeth Meriwether’s runaway robotic hit Heddatron at Steppenwolf Theatre, Sideshow has consistently produced engaging, transcendent works across Chicago. Sideshow is a resident at Victory Gardens in the historic Biograph Theater. Visit www.sideshowtheatre.org.

(images of artwork by Kevin Jennings and Jason Dunda)

Slow is excited to partner with Sideshow Theatre Company to present don’t trust the floor, an art exhibition based on—and theatrical reading of—Clare Barron’s new play in development Dirty Crusty.

Jeanine and Victor are accidentally reunited on the street. Apparently it’s been a while. Victor makes masks. Jeanine is a slob. Jeanine admires Synda dancing through a window. Synda is a ballerina. Something terrible happens. Granddad’s still there. Granddad is giant and prickly. Wild and vivid stage directions portray a hilarious, sometimes frightening scene definitely not for kids.

Artwork inspired by the play including video, sculpture, drawing and performance by Claire AshleyTony BalkoMeg Duguid, Jason Dunda, Max Byron Garett, Kevin Jennings, Chuck Jones, Julie PotratzRebecca Walz and Ryan Michael Pfeiffer is now on view at Slow.

The reading, directed by Sideshow’s artistic director Jonathan L. Green, will take place on June 21, 2014 beginning at 7:30 pm. Doors open at 6:00 pm.

Clare Barron is a playwright and performer from Wenatchee, Washington. Her plays include Baby Screams Miracle (Clubbed Thumb Summerworks); Solar Plexus (Ensemble Studio Theatre’s Marathon of One-Act Plays); Dirty Crusty; and You Got Older. She is the 2014 Page 73 Playwriting Fellow. She is also a current member of the Soho Rep Writer/Director Lab and Youngblood at EST. As an actor, Clare recently appeared in the world premiere of Heidi Schreck’s The Consultant at Long Wharf Theatre directed by Kip Fagan. In 2013 she traveled to Beirut to play Mae in an Arabic-English production of María Irene Fornés’ Mud.

From Sideshow Theatre Company’s first production, 2008’s Dante Dies!! (and then things get weird), to its Jeff Award-winning productions of Roland Schimmelpfennig’s Idomeneus(named one of the best plays of 2012 by Time Out Chicago and the Chicago Sun-Times) and Elizabeth Meriwether’s runaway robotic hit Heddatron at Steppenwolf Theatre, Sideshow has consistently produced engaging, transcendent works across Chicago. Sideshow is a resident at Victory Gardens in the historic Biograph Theater. Visit www.sideshowtheatre.org.

(artwork by Benjamin Bellas)
Paul’s NOT Gay Closing Remarks
Gay has shifted dramatically in a relatively short period of time. Normal and common. Even boring. But gay images haven’t changed as much. We are not entirely certain of what we mean when we identify. We are so comfortable with our monikers that we don’t feel compelled anymore to question what it means or what it is. It is still slippery, especially when it matters.

I don’t think I was born that way. 

I don’t think there is an immutable identity that I AM. 

I don’t think I chose. 

Perhaps there was intention for me to be born Paul, but I was born Puddin’. Grew into Paul years later. Stopped at Pumpkin and ‘Wog somewhere along the way. Melvin, Elder. Puddin’ was not gay. He was wildly affectionate, delightfully chubby, and had no sexual identity at all.

If there is a real me, he is not separate from what I do. I am my body, my decisions, my words, my thoughts, my actions, and my associations. But all of that shifts and grows, and is nothing like it was twenty years ago.

I made choices. Hundreds of people around me made thousands of choices. We decided early and often. Just like with voting and boxes of chocolates, we never really know what we’re getting. The choices were not made because of my real desire. My desire was for strawberry bubble yum. 

What part of me colors outside of gay borders? My shades of grey don’t sparkle as they should. I have always been a bad gay. I don’t really expect that to change. Gay is still a mystery to me. Gay is not central to how I think about who I am. Sexual freedom is. Freedom freedom is. Rebellion is. Moral is. Smart is. Visionary is. Paul is.

What is left?
-Paul

(artwork by Benjamin Bellas)

Paul’s NOT Gay Closing Remarks

Gay has shifted dramatically in a relatively short period of time. Normal and common. Even boring. But gay images haven’t changed as much. We are not entirely certain of what we mean when we identify. We are so comfortable with our monikers that we don’t feel compelled anymore to question what it means or what it is. It is still slippery, especially when it matters.

I don’t think I was born that way. 

I don’t think there is an immutable identity that I AM. 

I don’t think I chose. 

Perhaps there was intention for me to be born Paul, but I was born Puddin’. Grew into Paul years later. Stopped at Pumpkin and ‘Wog somewhere along the way. Melvin, Elder. Puddin’ was not gay. He was wildly affectionate, delightfully chubby, and had no sexual identity at all.

If there is a real me, he is not separate from what I do. I am my body, my decisions, my words, my thoughts, my actions, and my associations. But all of that shifts and grows, and is nothing like it was twenty years ago.

I made choices. Hundreds of people around me made thousands of choices. We decided early and often. Just like with voting and boxes of chocolates, we never really know what we’re getting. The choices were not made because of my real desire. My desire was for strawberry bubble yum. 

What part of me colors outside of gay borders? My shades of grey don’t sparkle as they should. I have always been a bad gay. I don’t really expect that to change. Gay is still a mystery to me. Gay is not central to how I think about who I am. Sexual freedom is. Freedom freedom is. Rebellion is. Moral is. Smart is. Visionary is. Paul is.

What is left?

-Paul