(artwork by Benjamin Bellas)
Paul’s NOT Gay Closing Remarks
Gay has shifted dramatically in a relatively short period of time. Normal and common. Even boring. But gay images haven’t changed as much. We are not entirely certain of what we mean when we identify. We are so comfortable with our monikers that we don’t feel compelled anymore to question what it means or what it is. It is still slippery, especially when it matters.

I don’t think I was born that way. 

I don’t think there is an immutable identity that I AM. 

I don’t think I chose. 

Perhaps there was intention for me to be born Paul, but I was born Puddin’. Grew into Paul years later. Stopped at Pumpkin and ‘Wog somewhere along the way. Melvin, Elder. Puddin’ was not gay. He was wildly affectionate, delightfully chubby, and had no sexual identity at all.

If there is a real me, he is not separate from what I do. I am my body, my decisions, my words, my thoughts, my actions, and my associations. But all of that shifts and grows, and is nothing like it was twenty years ago.

I made choices. Hundreds of people around me made thousands of choices. We decided early and often. Just like with voting and boxes of chocolates, we never really know what we’re getting. The choices were not made because of my real desire. My desire was for strawberry bubble yum. 

What part of me colors outside of gay borders? My shades of grey don’t sparkle as they should. I have always been a bad gay. I don’t really expect that to change. Gay is still a mystery to me. Gay is not central to how I think about who I am. Sexual freedom is. Freedom freedom is. Rebellion is. Moral is. Smart is. Visionary is. Paul is.

What is left?
-Paul

(artwork by Benjamin Bellas)

Paul’s NOT Gay Closing Remarks

Gay has shifted dramatically in a relatively short period of time. Normal and common. Even boring. But gay images haven’t changed as much. We are not entirely certain of what we mean when we identify. We are so comfortable with our monikers that we don’t feel compelled anymore to question what it means or what it is. It is still slippery, especially when it matters.

I don’t think I was born that way. 

I don’t think there is an immutable identity that I AM. 

I don’t think I chose. 

Perhaps there was intention for me to be born Paul, but I was born Puddin’. Grew into Paul years later. Stopped at Pumpkin and ‘Wog somewhere along the way. Melvin, Elder. Puddin’ was not gay. He was wildly affectionate, delightfully chubby, and had no sexual identity at all.

If there is a real me, he is not separate from what I do. I am my body, my decisions, my words, my thoughts, my actions, and my associations. But all of that shifts and grows, and is nothing like it was twenty years ago.

I made choices. Hundreds of people around me made thousands of choices. We decided early and often. Just like with voting and boxes of chocolates, we never really know what we’re getting. The choices were not made because of my real desire. My desire was for strawberry bubble yum. 

What part of me colors outside of gay borders? My shades of grey don’t sparkle as they should. I have always been a bad gay. I don’t really expect that to change. Gay is still a mystery to me. Gay is not central to how I think about who I am. Sexual freedom is. Freedom freedom is. Rebellion is. Moral is. Smart is. Visionary is. Paul is.

What is left?

-Paul

Paul’s NOT GayPresented by Molar ProductionsFebruary 14-March 14, 2014
Yet another tongue-in-cheek (or other body parts) group show proudly presented by Molar Productions (Larry Lee, prop.) this time, though, as a weak excuse to celebrate the fifth anniversary of slow.
Hard to believe that five years ago marked the start of his gallery with the inaugural exhibit/original question of Paul WHO?
Since then, many have come to find out who he is. So what’s the big f**king deal saying, “Paul’s not gay?” Well, perhaps the bevy of artists assembled—-a good number from that first show—-can do their best to dispute or shed light on the topic.
Anyway, come join us aboard our version of the Love Boat on Valentine’s Day to see proof positive that “Paul’s NOT Gay”…
With Benjamin Bellas, Judith Brotman, CC Ann Chen, Meg Duguid, Andreas Fischer, Jeffrey Grauel, John Henley, Andrew Holmquist, Greyson Hong, Theodore Horner, International Chefs of Mystery!, Carol Jackson, Carron Little, Nicholas Lowe, Ryan Noble, Susannah Papish, Steve Reber, Oli Rodriguez, Joshua Slater, Rafael E. Vera, Rebecca Walz and Ryan Michael Pfeiffer.

Paul’s NOT Gay
Presented by Molar Productions
February 14-March 14, 2014

Yet another tongue-in-cheek (or other body parts) group show proudly presented by Molar Productions (Larry Lee, prop.) this time, though, as a weak excuse to celebrate the fifth anniversary of slow.

Hard to believe that five years ago marked the start of his gallery with the inaugural exhibit/original question of Paul WHO?

Since then, many have come to find out who he is. So what’s the big f**king deal saying, “Paul’s not gay?” Well, perhaps the bevy of artists assembled—-a good number from that first show—-can do their best to dispute or shed light on the topic.

Anyway, come join us aboard our version of the Love Boat on Valentine’s Day to see proof positive that “Paul’s NOT Gay”…

With Benjamin Bellas, Judith Brotman, CC Ann Chen, Meg Duguid, Andreas Fischer, Jeffrey Grauel, John Henley, Andrew Holmquist, Greyson Hong, Theodore Horner, International Chefs of Mystery!, Carol Jackson, Carron Little, Nicholas Lowe, Ryan Noble, Susannah Papish, Steve Reber, Oli Rodriguez, Joshua Slater, Rafael E. Vera, Rebecca Walz and Ryan Michael Pfeiffer.

Your implications have implicationsCurated in partnership with Nicholas WylieLaura Davis, Rami George, Michael Sirianni, Stephanie Syjuco
November 16-December 14, 2013
We tell stories. We love the conflict, tension—when the tension stays in stories. Smart people take pieces of language apart, and find different patterns that say different stories than the words seem to say. Lawyers put together tiny pieces to tell the big thing. For just enough time, doubt (every other imaginable story) must be smothered for truth to be rendered in consequence.
Is a taunt for its recipient? Laura Davis’s cats are taunting the past. Conjuring (waking) the muse. The inspiration (call to arms) comes from shadows on the prison wall. It will remain unclear whether Yesterday is revved up because of her challengers or because she wants the attention of those of us who go down to observe her.How do we tell our own stories with a cold voice? How do I get away from “me” in order to see facts, events? Rami George’s story, or at least certain formative parts of his story, is remarkable because it has been told by media. He’s not a celebrity. Neither infamous nor victim. A character in a drama that played out in documentaries and newspapers. He’s retelling through fragments gleaned from professional strangers.Michael Sirianni is retelling a retelling. The next version of a story inevitably takes liberties with the original, and Michael is using those adjustments and tracking them as their own kind of plotline. Michael is not digging into the source material to illuminate a truth, but to immerse himself deeper into its fiction. He’s making lovers of his various fantasies and sharing a cigarette after his evening with them.Stephanie Syjuco is making herself a target. Not in the guise of a pacifist. An editor of crime. She has removed the intoxicant from the dime bag, but kept the risks of illicit trade. She sets herself and others up to appear guilty. She doesn’t leave her cohorts totally out in the cold. She masks or confuses the vulnerable shot that will take the whole operation down.Laura Davis is an interdisciplinary artist who examines and reconfigures society’s psychological relationships with objects. At first glance, her sculptures, drawings, and installations appear docile, but upon further inspection, the work has a dark and menacing undertone. Davis received her MFA from the University of Chicago in 2004. She currently teaches in the Contemporary Practices department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and is an adjunct faculty member at Columbia College Chicago. She has exhibited at venues such as the Evanston Art Center, Chicago; Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago; Gallery 400, Chicago; Aron Packer Gallery, Chicago; SPACES, Cleveland; The Dairy Center for the Arts, Boulder; and the Urban Institute for Contemporary Art, Grand Rapids, MI.Rami George was born in the summer of 1989, a year known for its numerous revolutions, the signing of the Taif Agreement (beginning the end of the Lebanese Civil War), and the conception of the World Wide Web. He spent a childhood marked by these and other significant events. He completed his BFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2012, and has shown in various cities including San Francisco, New Orleans, Prague, and Chicago – where he currently resides. He continues to be influenced and motivated by political struggles and missing narratives. One might call him a “radical softie.”Born in upstate New York, Michael Sirianni received his MFA from the University of Illinois, Chicago in 2010. His exhibitions include New Capital Projects (Chicago), Johalla Projects (Chicago), the CUE Art Foundation (New York), Iceberg Projects (Chicago), Los Caminos (St. Louis), Gallery 400 (Chicago), the Urban Institute of Contemporary Art (Grand Rapids), the Antimatter Film Festival (Vancouver), Fleisher/Ollman Gallery (Philadelphia) and the Hyde Park Arts Center (Chicago). A 2010 recipient of Joan Mitchell Foundation MFA Grant, Sirianni lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.Born in the Philippines, Stephanie Syjuco received her MFA from Stanford University and BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. Her work has been shown nationally and internationally, and included in exhibitions at MoMA/P.S.1, the Whitney Museum of American Art, SFMOMA, ZKM Center for Art and Technology, Germany; Z33 Space for Contemporary Art, Belgium; UniversalStudios Gallery Beijing; The Contemporary Arts Museum Houston; and the California Biennial at the Orange County Museum of Art, among others. In 2007 she led counterfeiting workshops in Istanbul and in 2009 contributed proxy sculptures for MOMA/P.S.1’s joint exhibition, “1969.” She has taught at Stanford University, The California College of the Arts, The San Francisco Art Institute, Mills College, Carnegie Mellon University, and will be joining the faculty at the University of California at Berkeley in January 2014 as an Assistant Professor in Sculpture. A recipient of a 2009 Joan Mitchell Painters and Sculptors Award, she lives and works in San Francisco.
Your implications have implications
Curated in partnership with Nicholas Wylie
Laura Davis, Rami George, Michael Sirianni, Stephanie Syjuco
November 16-December 14, 2013

We tell stories. We love the conflict, tension—when the tension stays in stories. Smart people take pieces of language apart, and find different patterns that say different stories than the words seem to say. Lawyers put together tiny pieces to tell the big thing. For just enough time, doubt (every other imaginable story) must be smothered for truth to be rendered in consequence.

Is a taunt for its recipient? Laura Davis’s cats are taunting the past. Conjuring (waking) the muse. The inspiration (call to arms) comes from shadows on the prison wall. It will remain unclear whether Yesterday is revved up because of her challengers or because she wants the attention of those of us who go down to observe her.

How do we tell our own stories with a cold voice? How do I get away from “me” in order to see facts, events? Rami George’s story, or at least certain formative parts of his story, is remarkable because it has been told by media. He’s not a celebrity. Neither infamous nor victim. A character in a drama that played out in documentaries and newspapers. He’s retelling through fragments gleaned from professional strangers.

Michael Sirianni is retelling a retelling. The next version of a story inevitably takes liberties with the original, and Michael is using those adjustments and tracking them as their own kind of plotline. Michael is not digging into the source material to illuminate a truth, but to immerse himself deeper into its fiction. He’s making lovers of his various fantasies and sharing a cigarette after his evening with them.

Stephanie Syjuco is making herself a target. Not in the guise of a pacifist. An editor of crime. She has removed the intoxicant from the dime bag, but kept the risks of illicit trade. She sets herself and others up to appear guilty. She doesn’t leave her cohorts totally out in the cold. She masks or confuses the vulnerable shot that will take the whole operation down.

Laura Davis is an interdisciplinary artist who examines and reconfigures society’s psychological relationships with objects. At first glance, her sculptures, drawings, and installations appear docile, but upon further inspection, the work has a dark and menacing undertone. Davis received her MFA from the University of Chicago in 2004. She currently teaches in the Contemporary Practices department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and is an adjunct faculty member at Columbia College Chicago. She has exhibited at venues such as the Evanston Art Center, Chicago; Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago; Gallery 400, Chicago; Aron Packer Gallery, Chicago; SPACES, Cleveland; The Dairy Center for the Arts, Boulder; and the Urban Institute for Contemporary Art, Grand Rapids, MI.

Rami George was born in the summer of 1989, a year known for its numerous revolutions, the signing of the Taif Agreement (beginning the end of the Lebanese Civil War), and the conception of the World Wide Web. He spent a childhood marked by these and other significant events. He completed his BFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2012, and has shown in various cities including San Francisco, New Orleans, Prague, and Chicago – where he currently resides. He continues to be influenced and motivated by political struggles and missing narratives. One might call him a “radical softie.”

Born in upstate New York, Michael Sirianni received his MFA from the University of Illinois, Chicago in 2010. His exhibitions include New Capital Projects (Chicago), Johalla Projects (Chicago), the CUE Art Foundation (New York), Iceberg Projects (Chicago), Los Caminos (St. Louis), Gallery 400 (Chicago), the Urban Institute of Contemporary Art (Grand Rapids), the Antimatter Film Festival (Vancouver), Fleisher/Ollman Gallery (Philadelphia) and the Hyde Park Arts Center (Chicago). A 2010 recipient of Joan Mitchell Foundation MFA Grant, Sirianni lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Born in the Philippines, Stephanie Syjuco received her MFA from Stanford University and BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. Her work has been shown nationally and internationally, and included in exhibitions at MoMA/P.S.1, the Whitney Museum of American Art, SFMOMA, ZKM Center for Art and Technology, Germany; Z33 Space for Contemporary Art, Belgium; UniversalStudios Gallery Beijing; The Contemporary Arts Museum Houston; and the California Biennial at the Orange County Museum of Art, among others. In 2007 she led counterfeiting workshops in Istanbul and in 2009 contributed proxy sculptures for MOMA/P.S.1’s joint exhibition, “1969.” She has taught at Stanford University, The California College of the Arts, The San Francisco Art Institute, Mills College, Carnegie Mellon University, and will be joining the faculty at the University of California at Berkeley in January 2014 as an Assistant Professor in Sculpture. A recipient of a 2009 Joan Mitchell Painters and Sculptors Award, she lives and works in San Francisco.
slow is going back to school. Sort of.There is an office on Washington College campus, a small liberal arts college in a part of our nation known as the Eastern Shore, that has become an alternative exhibition space. Directed by Benjamin Bellas. We conjured the logic of reverse Polish notation (sorry for the math geek reference) with our representation agreement. Benjamin’s space, Daly 208 projects, is featuring slow. Sort of.A new venue presented the opportunity for a show; I jumped at the chance to include Jeffrey’s work. Jeffrey pairs perfectly with Judith. We own our slippage, our contradictions. We are gleefully representing Jeffrey’s and Judith’s work in a show that is ambiguously slow. The gallery director’s 6 year old son, Archer, will be offering juice boxes to the eager minds who attend the opening reception.Post Orientation is **cking awesome.

Post OrientationJudith Brotman and Jeffrey GrauelOctober 25-November 15, 2013You are in college now. Far enough in that you have been called upon to think, to synthesize, to perform. Early enough in a semester that you are waiting, perhaps, to be moved, to find yourself changed by the mythical college experience.Judith Brotman and Jeffrey Grauel are brought together in this gallery on this campus to address some of the mythic changes. You had your summer. Perhaps the best summer of your life. Rife with awareness of freedom, how fleeting and fickle that freedom can be. Pregnant with anticipation. Get it while you can, while you’re young. Judith recounts her blissful (and angst driven) dreams of summer. This is your time, your opportunity to live your own rules and escape the shackles of too many parents and too many principals (principles). Jeffrey looks at the world through beer-hazed filters.Summer has transitioned to fall, and with the leaves, comfortable truths flutter to the ground. Cover the solid ground and hide the boundaries that used to seem so clear. But we’re in college now. We’re here to embrace challenging truths. Explore meaning. Judith is offering a golden opportunity. Accept her word, and you are empowered to generate meaning on your own terms. Jeffrey is offering a twisted truth—a conceptual drawing. It is charcoal on paper, as simple to grasp as anything can be. Jeffrey has created a platform. Use it to its full soapbox potential. Of course, grasp in this case has turned every intention on its head—he’s speaking about the use of that opposable thumb, the mundanity of a spoon or pencil, and not grasping concepts as we expect to do in the grand lecture hall. Judith and Jeffrey are instigating a primal rebellion against the knowledge you came here to seek. They offer knowing too, but the conventions of their sorts of meaning are mostly avoided inside these (college) walls.Finally there is the projection to the next space. That change you are all waiting to recognize—where will my education lead me, and what kind of life is it preparing me to lead? Judith and Jeffrey are painting landscapes. Judith’s field is fecund with the wild things. Not scary, but certainly undomesticated. Jeffrey’s is not exactly mountainous, but acknowledges the coming climb. Bouldering. If you sit in these regions you may uncover the thing each artist uncovered in the makings: that the next place, the led life, the new vision is found in the dumb mundane places you find yourselves already. The move is interior, subtle, and loud all at the same time. This place looks like a joke of an environment- the place you have to be before you are in the place where you want to get to, the destiny, a graduation into something real. But here we are, in our bodies, our changed bodies, with our walk, changed walk through this place, changed place. Changed because we’ve tromped through the fallen leaves that blurred the comforting boundaries. Here we are new people leading new lives in new places. Looking at the dumb and fake seaming place is the only place we are, so it is the only place to look and so is the only place where we can see—it is a pretty big set of changes and some of the larger lessons learned.
slow is going back to school. Sort of.

There is an office on Washington College campus, a small liberal arts college in a part of our nation known as the Eastern Shore, that has become an alternative exhibition space. Directed by Benjamin Bellas. We conjured the logic of reverse Polish notation (sorry for the math geek reference) with our representation agreement. Benjamin’s space, Daly 208 projects, is featuring slow. Sort of.

A new venue presented the opportunity for a show; I jumped at the chance to include Jeffrey’s work. Jeffrey pairs perfectly with Judith. We own our slippage, our contradictions. We are gleefully representing Jeffrey’s and Judith’s work in a show that is ambiguously slow. The gallery director’s 6 year old son, Archer, will be offering juice boxes to the eager minds who attend the opening reception.

Post Orientation is **cking awesome.

Post Orientation
Judith Brotman and Jeffrey Grauel
October 25-November 15, 2013

You are in college now. Far enough in that you have been called upon to think, to synthesize, to perform. Early enough in a semester that you are waiting, perhaps, to be moved, to find yourself changed by the mythical college experience.

Judith Brotman and Jeffrey Grauel are brought together in this gallery on this campus to address some of the mythic changes. You had your summer. Perhaps the best summer of your life. Rife with awareness of freedom, how fleeting and fickle that freedom can be. Pregnant with anticipation. Get it while you can, while you’re young. Judith recounts her blissful (and angst driven) dreams of summer. This is your time, your opportunity to live your own rules and escape the shackles of too many parents and too many principals (principles). Jeffrey looks at the world through beer-hazed filters.

Summer has transitioned to fall, and with the leaves, comfortable truths flutter to the ground. Cover the solid ground and hide the boundaries that used to seem so clear. But we’re in college now. We’re here to embrace challenging truths. Explore meaning. Judith is offering a golden opportunity. Accept her word, and you are empowered to generate meaning on your own terms. Jeffrey is offering a twisted truth—a conceptual drawing. It is charcoal on paper, as simple to grasp as anything can be. Jeffrey has created a platform. Use it to its full soapbox potential. Of course, grasp in this case has turned every intention on its head—he’s speaking about the use of that opposable thumb, the mundanity of a spoon or pencil, and not grasping concepts as we expect to do in the grand lecture hall. Judith and Jeffrey are instigating a primal rebellion against the knowledge you came here to seek. They offer knowing too, but the conventions of their sorts of meaning are mostly avoided inside these (college) walls.

Finally there is the projection to the next space. That change you are all waiting to recognize—where will my education lead me, and what kind of life is it preparing me to lead? Judith and Jeffrey are painting landscapes. Judith’s field is fecund with the wild things. Not scary, but certainly undomesticated. Jeffrey’s is not exactly mountainous, but acknowledges the coming climb. Bouldering. If you sit in these regions you may uncover the thing each artist uncovered in the makings: that the next place, the led life, the new vision is found in the dumb mundane places you find yourselves already. The move is interior, subtle, and loud all at the same time. This place looks like a joke of an environment- the place you have to be before you are in the place where you want to get to, the destiny, a graduation into something real. But here we are, in our bodies, our changed bodies, with our walk, changed walk through this place, changed place. Changed because we’ve tromped through the fallen leaves that blurred the comforting boundaries. Here we are new people leading new lives in new places. Looking at the dumb and fake seaming place is the only place we are, so it is the only place to look and so is the only place where we can see—it is a pretty big set of changes and some of the larger lessons learned.